Essex mother begs for help for her violent autistic son

A single mother is begging for help for her nine-year-old autistic son who violently attacks her every day before he ends up in prison – or ‘kills someone’.

Caroline Lewis, 50, said her youngest son Paulie has struggled with behavioural problems since ‘before he could speak’.

He has battered her with a cricket bat, lashed out at classmates, and even broke his teacher’s thumb during his uncontrollable daily outbursts.

Caroline Lewis, 50, said her youngest son Paulie has struggled with behavioural problems since ‘before he could speak’

The mother-of-three said his behaviour is so uncontrollable parents at his first school launched a petition to have him expelled.

His most violent outbursts see him threatening to kill his mother and teachers – but often end with the confused boy begging Ms Lewis to end his life.

The desperate mother claims she has begged Essex County Council to get him a place at a specialist boarding school for three years – but is still waiting.

She reached near-breaking point last month when teachers permanently excluded him because they cannot cope – leaving Ms Lewis as a ‘prisoner’ to cope with him alone.

It comes despite him being referred to Children and Adolescent Mental Health Services four times and two police officers asking social services to help.

Ms Lewis is speaking out in a bid to get the council to get him a place at a specialist boarding school – before it’s ‘too late’.

The mother, from Clacton, Essex, said: ‘If he doesn’t warrant help, who does? It sounds terrible to say when, but he’s tomorrow’s psychopath.

‘Psychopaths are without any empathy and are violent and that’s him. He can’t understand other people.

He has battered her with a cricket bat, lashed out at classmates, and even broke his teacher’s thumb during his uncontrollable daily outbursts

‘If he doesn’t get the intensive specialist help he will kill someone, which sounds like a terrible thing for a mum to say, but I’m just being realistic.

‘He’s eight now and I can just cope. When he’s 11 or 12 I’m not sure I will be able to.

‘And when I know that early intervention is the difference between him going down that path and doing something far worse than hitting me, it’s heartbreaking.

‘He has broken his teachers’s thumb and I’m covered in scratches and bruises. He has tried to strangle kids. He has stabbed a kitten and punched a bulldog.

‘If something doesn’t change then 100 per cent know what’s going to happen in the future.

‘It will be Broadmoor. He’ll definitely be locked up.

‘I am afraid when he attacks me. I keep knives and scissors out the way, but he uses anything to hand – coat hangers, football boots, chairs. I am scared.’

Ms Lewis said she knew Paulie was different ‘immediately’ and starting asking for help from health visitors when he was 18 months old.

‘I knew from when he was a baby something was wrong,’ she said.

‘He was such hard work and was hyperactive.

The mother-of-three said his behaviour is so uncontrollable parents at his first school launched a petition to have him expelled

‘Before he could hit, he would pull these faces I had never seen a child make before – pure frustration and anger.’

His first contact with Children & Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) came aged two when he stabbed a kitten with a fork, she said.

He was diagnosed with anxiety and Ms Lewis claims she was told to let him grow out of it, but he continued to exhibit controlling and aggressive behaviour.

‘He tried to control everyone around him – where we sat and what we did – and if you didn’t he would scream,’ she said.

Ms Lewis e said he would ‘suddenly attack’ other children when he was at nursery, but things got worse once he joined school.

He ‘went for’ another child with a pair of scissors prompting the parent to start a petition to have Paulie removed from the school.

‘All the kids were coming out of school with scratches,’ said Ms Lewis .

‘It was every day he was lashing out. They had never known a child be send to the headmaster’s office so many times.

‘Walking across the school playground to pick him up was like the walk of shame.

‘One of the parents put a photo of her child on Facebook with scratches. It was really bad for a little kid of his age.’

CAHMS got involved for a second time when he was aged four and Paulie was diagnosed with autism.

Tests revealed he has ‘average intelligence’ but is in the ‘second percentile’ – the lowest two per cent of all children – for social and emotional awareness, his mum said.

He was given a course of art therapy, and Ms Lewis was given access to a parenting group – but that was it, she claims.

She admits to thinking he would ‘grow out of it’ and his outbursts would lessen, and moved him to a new school.

His most violent outbursts see him threatening to kill his mother and teachers – but often end with the confused boy begging Ms Lewis to end his life

Four years ago Paulie pu